Tuesday 16th Oct 2018 - Logistics Manager Magazine

Viewing all Penelope Ody articles

Fulfilling store needs

Online transactions, heading for 40-50 per cent of total sales in many sectors, are driving major transformation of retail supply chains – as well as significant changes to workforce and task management systems.   As Tony Stockil, CEO of consultants, Javelin Group, said in his presentation at last month’s Retail Business Technology Expo, retailers are […]

Tackling the merry-go-round

Online sales may be booming but so are the returns. With e-commerce now accounting for almost 20 per cent of UK non-food sales, reducing the returns rate – especially in the fashion sector – will be vital to maintain margins

Planning for an end-to-end service

Christmas is coming and the geese are getting fat – but will they be delivered on time? Or shall we see retailers taking matters into their own hands?

Integrating the options

As retail channels proliferate and customers expect instant and accurate information about orders and availability, supply chain systems have moved into pole position enabling many of tomorrow’s ‘must-have’ attributes

Counting the cost

As retail chains write down their store assets and high streets atrophy, home delivery becomes increasingly important in the over-all “cost to serve”. Is the model sustainable or will something have to change?

Moving the goalposts

As the lines between in-store and online blur, are retail supply chain priorities shifting from regular replenishment to delivering to order with “keeping the shelves filled” no longer considered a necessity?

Dictating demand

In an omni-channel world supply chain management needs to embrace more than just products, deliveries and the internet

Managing collection

With ‘click and collect’ now described as ‘mandatory’ by many e-commerce experts the implications for retail supply chains are significant and far-reaching – how will they cope with the challenges?

Lost in the post

GLIT – goods lost in transit – is an increasing problem as online shopping grows and less than honest customers find it can be an almost foolproof way for acquiring a few extras. What can retailers and carriers do?

Putting logistics into reverse

Like all distance selling, online retailing involves a great many returns and customers are already opting for easier ways to send back unwanted good