Thursday 12th Dec 2019 - Logistics Manager Magazine

Viewing all Supply Chain Awards articles

Winner: Dell

The judging for ‘overall winner’ is not quite as straightforward as might appear. Although by definition the ‘number one’ will be one of the sectoral category winners, the judges like to nominate a Second and Third, and because of the differences in perfo

Winner: NHS Logistics Authority

This sector typically attracts a widely disparate set of entries, and 2004 was no exception. They ranged from airline catering to hospital supplies, and from a privatised utility to a service company for the electronics industry.

Winner: Dell (2)

In recent years the Hi-tech sector has tended to set the standard. This season saw five very different finalists on the shortlist – Chloride Power (jointly with CPG Logistics), Dell, Rockwell Automation, Swisscom Mobile and Computacenter (both the latter

Winner: Rexam Beverage Can Europe

This category produced probably the most closely fought contest among the sector categories and included – Ducati Motor Holdings of Bolgna, Italy, Lafarge Nida Gips (partly French-owned but located in Poland), Philips Lighting in Eindhoeven, the Netherlan

In pursuit of excellence

For the finalists of the eighth year of the European Supply Chain Excellence Awards, gathered at The Dorchester Hotel on the evening of the 18th November, there could have been few surprises that the overall winner’s trophy went to Dell.

Winner: Dell (3)

Whatever the commitment to ‘total supply chain’, there is no doubt that logistics and fulfilment remain the core supply chain competences, and the area where the metrics will make or break an Awards entry.

Professor Martin Christopher

‘Making product available is critical to the way you compete,’ says the eminent British supply chain thinker and academic